Kim Meeks Named Director of Faculty and Staff Development

533
0
Share:
Kim Meeks

MACON – Dr. Jean R. Sumner, dean of Mercer University School of Medicine (MUSM), recently announced the appointment of Kim Meeks as director of faculty and staff development in faculty affairs.

“Kim Meeks is an outstanding leader of the library and has been a tremendous asset to the School of Medicine. She has willingly agreed to accept this new role to support faculty and staff efforts of development and to guide us to new heights,” said Dr. Sumner.

Meeks obtained her undergraduate degree from Georgia College and State University and her Master of Library Information Studies from the University of Alabama. Currently, she is pursuing a Master of Science in organizational leadership from Mercer.

She has served MUSM in various capacities, including instructional support specialist, learning resource center manager and systems and electronic resources librarian. In 2013, she was appointed interim library director, before being named director in 2014.

In 2018, she completed a yearlong certificate program on Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) through the Association of American Medical Colleges. She is interested in mindfulness techniques, and in 2017, she attended a course, titled “Experiential Faculty Training Program in Mind-Body Medicine,” through Georgetown University and the Institute for Integrative Health.

About Mercer University School of Medicine (Macon, Savannah and Columbus)

Mercer University’s School of Medicine was established in 1982 to educate physicians and health professionals to meet the primary care and healthcare needs of rural and medically underserved areas of Georgia. Today, more than 60 percent of graduates currently practice in the state of Georgia, and of those, more than 80 percent are practicing in rural or medically underserved areas of Georgia. Mercer medical students benefit from a problem-based medical education program that provides early patient care experiences. Such an academic environment fosters the early development of clinical problem-solving and instills in each student an awareness of the place of the basic medical sciences in medical practice. The School opened a full four-year campus in Savannah in 2008 at Memorial University Medical Center. In 2012, the School began offering clinical education for third- and fourth-year medical students in Columbus. Following their second year, students participate in core clinical clerkships at the School’s primary teaching hospitals: Medical Center, Navicent Health in Macon; Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah; and The Medical Center and St. Francis Hospital in Columbus. The School also offers master’s degrees in family therapy, preclinical sciences and biomedical sciences.

Print Article
Share:
Kyle Sears